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The grumpy Dad
15-10-2008, 04:07 PM
Spending the best part of tomorrow driving round posting letters asking permission to shoot on farm land etc.Used all the best "pink and fluffy ":D Insured , responsible , boundries respected , backstops , etc etc etc.;)

Been at it a couple of weeks now and you`d think I was asking for to borrow the crown jewels for a haloween party. Even buying my fruit and veg of one I think I`ve got a chance with:rolleyes: Back in Tescos next week no doubt." ruddy great pumpkins for my daughters for halloween from another (going to take them back there trick or treating to try and recoop some funds next week):D

Got 50 letters printed off and will post how many positives I get back in the next couple of weeks , fingers crossed.:rolleyes:

TERRYT
15-10-2008, 05:06 PM
Spending the best part of tomorrow driving round posting letters asking permission to shoot on farm land etc.Used all the best "pink and fluffy ":D Insured , responsible , boundries respected , backstops , etc etc etc.;)

Been at it a couple of weeks now and you`d think I was asking for to borrow the crown jewels for a haloween party. Even buying my fruit and veg of one I think I`ve got a chance with:rolleyes: Back in Tescos next week no doubt." ruddy great pumpkins for my daughters for halloween from another (going to take them back there trick or treating to try and recoop some funds next week):D

Got 50 letters printed off and will post how many positives I get back in the next couple of weeks , fingers crossed.:rolleyes:

Going to be easy, Lee,all the guys on here will tell you the same,its all
about what you put in, and patience, i would imagine its much harder
if you live in a big city,just keep at it, and it will come,and once you have
your first permission others will probably follow;)

ATVB TERRY:)

C3PO_1
15-10-2008, 07:24 PM
One important thing with letters is spelling and grammar. Getting it right makes a good impression towards their attitude to giving shooting rights there.

Dave E
15-10-2008, 07:45 PM
Keep trying !

See it from their point of view; Would you let someone you didn't know wander around your land with a gun.

It might help if you look at the land first and personalise it. " I've noticed that your fields of crops have extensive rabbit/pigeon damage....."
"I notice that you have numerous pigeons on your barns which are likely to contaminate livestock feed"

I'm sure you'll get something in the end.

Dave E

T 20
15-10-2008, 09:59 PM
Spending the best part of tomorrow driving round posting letters asking permission to shoot on farm land etc.Used all the best "pink and fluffy ":D Insured , responsible , boundries respected , backstops , etc etc etc.;)

Been at it a couple of weeks now and you`d think I was asking for to borrow the crown jewels for a haloween party. Even buying my fruit and veg of one I think I`ve got a chance with:rolleyes: Back in Tescos next week no doubt." ruddy great pumpkins for my daughters for halloween from another (going to take them back there trick or treating to try and recoop some funds next week):D

Got 50 letters printed off and will post how many positives I get back in the next couple of weeks , fingers crossed.:rolleyes:


Hi Lee

After forty odd years of dealing with Farmers here's some usefull tips.

Farms tend to be run as a business and as such they recieve tons of junk mail, guess where your letters tend to end up.

As a business all business cards tend to be kept for years on end.
Nothing too flash, Airgun vermin control with name and Phone number will do.

Try to approach the Farmer and introduce yourself and leave him a card.

Don't stop him working if he is busy and don't start banging on about insurance and boundries etc etc, unless he asks.
If you get permission that's the time to show your insurance, and the farmer will show you his boundries.

Don't get mardy arsed with anyone as Farmers all tend to be in touch with one another.

I know it seems like a lot of hard work but it is worth it in the end.

All the best Mick

Chandlers
15-10-2008, 10:14 PM
An offer of unpaid help on the farm always goes down well, especially if you can demonstrate some knowledge in regard to their business.
The best way to secure shooting permission though, is to know people who know people, which can take years...

Ric O'shay
16-10-2008, 06:49 AM
I tried the same posting letters methods. When ever i went out cycling i noted down the contact details from signs outside farms.
From 76 letters and a months collecting info i got two phone calls.
One couldnt let me on as his land was being quarried and the other said come and shoot the rabbits. That 1 positive reply made all the effort worth it.

A month later i telephone a few of the farms i had written to. Most of them werent against shooting but either already had airgunners or shotgun syndicates. One however said " come over and shoot the rots i'm over run with em".

Perseverence pays off

Happy shootin

mr who?
16-10-2008, 07:11 AM
Manc lee .

Dont just think of asking farmers mate , think of other places that may require some "free" vermin control . How about asking golf coures , stables or garden centers etc...

Wear smart/casual clothing , no camo , leave your rifle at home , remain polite , even if given a "No thanks!" , offer to split the game with them , and offer to keep an eye on things all the time you are on their land , and offer to report back to them with any prolems with fly tippers , damage to fences etc...

If given a "No" ask if its okay if you leave a card , and if you can make a return visit in around 6 months time . Of if they know of anybody who it would be worth your while asking .

Good luck mate , if it was easy , we would all have loads of land to shoot over all the time wouldnt we? Stick with it and dont give up . let us know how you get on?

Hth atb fellas .

Andy .

The grumpy Dad
16-10-2008, 11:10 AM
Cheers for the advice everyone some helpful tips in there.;)

Put about 20 out thismorning and had a good bit of banter with a couple of them.One old guy in particular telling me about a mink he got the other night and both debating the better method , shotgun versus air rifle for rabbits hes got problems with.A visitor turned up as we were chatting so I left sharpish,but I`d like to think I stood a chance with him.;)

Quick bite to eat and a brew and got about a dozen more I plan to do today.

Will let you know any replies I get.

Thanks again:D

C3PO_1
16-10-2008, 11:19 AM
Good luck, you're working hard there and you'll get something(s) very soon I'm sure!

sniperfx
16-10-2008, 11:29 AM
Good luck Lee, excellent work mate.

danco1987
16-10-2008, 03:26 PM
Good luck Lee! Let us know how you get along.

Loonboy
16-10-2008, 03:38 PM
One important thing with letters is spelling and grammar. Getting it right makes a good impression towards their attitude to giving shooting rights there.

the joy of microsoft word ;)

Blacky
27-10-2009, 11:30 AM
Any luck yet ?

westy306
27-10-2009, 11:27 PM
I always put references on any letters I send out.

They are likely to know their neighbours and this can put their minds at rest. If they want to check up on you, they can; it shows you have nothing to hide.

Top tips to get permission:

Send letter with references.
Call by telephone after a few days.
Printout a google earth map of the surrounding area (More likely to show fences and
Have a good draft permission slip ready.
Offer to visit to discuss any vermin problems they may have on their land and what you can do to help.
Discuss access, times, hazards and offer part of your future bag to the landowner.
Show them you have a real passion for your sport and not just "some bloke who wants to do some shooting on their farm".
Show them your shooting insurance documents.
Get the landowner to show you their boundries on a map and mark them on your google map.
I normally do a bit of "Paintshop Pro" on the map and insert it into a Word document to form a professional looking permission slip.
Post said professional permission slip to the land owner and invite them to suggest any changes.
Revisit to collect signed permission slip.
Reap the rewards of your labour.

It sounds a bit long winded, but each step sets their minds at rest and builds trust over a short time.

Be prepared for the ocassional "anti". Each to his own I say.

ATB

westy306

jondee
28-10-2009, 12:18 AM
well i hope he got a shoot,as i have tried the same thing,no letters and just calling over 2 days and i tried previously as far as wales.:eek:
anyway i eventually got a shoot on a golfcourse and would you believe it,it was the first one i called at but,i did have to call back and boy was it worth it,i then got another some time later.
so keep trying and never give up,i know it is not easy and anyone can say keep going and it can be disheartening at times but,the rewards are good for those who keep going.
atb

jon
ps,,met a guy off here who has been trying for a shoot for over 5 years and not got one,so i took him on my shoot to help perk him up and it did revive his enthusiasm for a shoot of his own.

GAV1N
28-10-2009, 02:33 AM
I sent 20 letters and got 5 farms to shoot on.
My top 'Letter' tip is not to ask for shooting permission but rather to only ask for a meeting in which to discuss the possibility of shooting permission. Sounds like a small difference but you are asking for a much smaller initial commitment which once granted is more likely to be followed by a second positive commitment. Standard sales psychology really.

Tailz
28-10-2009, 06:51 AM
Is there some way to find out the full farm address, including the farmers name, other than driving up to the farm house of course. Some farms are hidden out of the way, or is it much more important to hand deliver letters of request?

Dakine
28-10-2009, 02:19 PM
Just my Two Pence but ive found it much more productive just to go knocking on doors, That way you get an instant decision and the land owner gets a chance to meet you in person, which from my experience is much more preferable.

My shooting partner and I have about 2000 acres of permissions now spread over 6 farms, all from just a friendly knock, only had 2 rejections and they were still very helpful by suggesting other places to try :)
Just be pleasant and respectful and hopefully your character will shine through.
Oh and dont wear your DPM's for the initial knock, just dress casually.

Christmas is coming up too so ill be dropping a little hamper round at each permission, not to lick boots but just a simple friendly gesture to show you appreciate their trust ;)

all the best.

jax13
28-10-2009, 02:44 PM
trying to avoid sounding like a pessimist but from 50 letters, i would expect no more than 3 calls. at the most.

you may be lucky and get quite a few but don't hold your breath. Land is pretty much tied up everywhere these days by syndicates or hobbyists who have worked hard for the land or have dropped lucky in the pub / been recommended by a friend of the landowner.


its the same response as everyone else but if there are no positive replies, just keep at it and it will pay off eventually. make sure you add plant /vegetable growers, golf courses & driving ranges, stables / paddocks to your list - you never know where permissions may come from!

PeteB
28-10-2009, 03:58 PM
I emailed all of the golf courses and farming related concerns (but no actual farms) in my area (20 mile radius) with the help of Yell.com

I used Jackels letter as a template and edited it to suit my needs. With about 5 mins work, I had secured a permission and have another one awaiting their current shooter leaving at the end of November.

No need to go around in a shirt and tie, harping on about insurance, boundaries, free work etc. I just sat in my underpants on the settee and did some typing.


Easy peasy.

Big Mafoota
28-10-2009, 07:22 PM
I've only ever approached a few places as my mate has knocked a few and been succesful and I've shot with him on those. I currently have an 18 hole course because I was in the next hospital bed to the steward of the club. Today I got a 30 acre manor house through a bloke my Dad knows. The Lady ( and I do mean Lady, wife of a Lord) even asked me how much I charge! Sometimes it's just luck.
I knocked another large farm today and while I couldn't get permission due to a syndicate taking care of pest control, I did have a good chat to the farmer and I think he would have been fine if the syndicate situation was different.

At the end of the day you'd be providing them with a service and they don't really have the time to take care of it themselves usually. I don't mention insurance or anything about free services to the farmer, they know the crack and they just want someone trustworth who will get the job done with the minimum of fuss.

If you think air rifle is hard then try getting permission for a firearm!

GAV1N
28-10-2009, 08:05 PM
Just out of interest, all you guys who have Golf course permission, do you have to only shoot at night?
I assume dry daylight days theres always someone wanting to play golf?

Big Mafoota
28-10-2009, 08:28 PM
Just out of interest, all you guys who have Golf course permission, do you have to only shoot at night?
I assume dry daylight days theres always someone wanting to play golf?

I can only shoot at night which can be tough as they get lamp shy.

jondee
28-10-2009, 08:35 PM
Just out of interest, all you guys who have Golf course permission, do you have to only shoot at night?
I assume dry daylight days theres always someone wanting to play golf?

depens on greenkeeper etc..myself and mate were told once,why can`t you shoot squirrels at night?..try keeping a straight face for that one..:D
i also go on in summer while it is light and shoot rabbits or squirrel with hmr but,i`m aware of where golfers are and shoot well away from them.no problems to date from that either.
shoot squirrels with air rifle fac and is a good way of getting rid of them..the greenkeeper told us to and said ,if anyone says anything,then tell them to see him..:)
jon