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Thread: A 'How to' guide to sharpening a knife the traditional way.

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by snock View Post
    Diamond stones are very harsh on the blade steel. If you want to preserve your blade for maximum life, whilst keeping it at it's sharpest, then I really would use something more traditional.

    Diamond stones are fine for plane irons and such, as they don't lose their flatness due to wear.

    thought id have a quick say on this subject
    i have been a butcher for more years than i dare say (about 15/20) !!! we still only use the traditional steel if this is used regulary it will keep a keen edge on any knife i only grind my knives once a year (with an oil stone) i can keep a boneing (skining knife ) for 3 to 4 years to give a clue that one knife would bone out /cut 2whole cows/40-50lambs/8-10pigs a week
    CZ VARMIT 16" .22LR with MTC VIPER 4X16X50 AYA sbs 12bore , ,2 very keen jacks, http://www.blessedarethefew.com/

  2. #32
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    Hollow edge

    When majoring in Industrial Arts we were taught to sharpen tools on a wet wheel to produce a hollow edge. Once the hollow edge is produced you use a series of progressively fine wet (black) sand paper starting with about 500 and ending with 1000. These papers are mounted on a piece of glass to for a perfectly flat surface. The edge is conditioned by bringing the edge of the blade into the paper, not away. At the 1000 grit mark, if all goes well, the burr edge will begin to fall off (wear through). At this point head to your leather strop conditioned with fine rubbing compound. The burr will then be abraded through. A few more strokes and you will have a fabulous edge. You can buy a cheap wet wheel grinder unit at Harbor Freight. This technique is the same for lathe tools, knives, chisels, axes, .....Although I find a single stroke (fine) file out in the field with an axe is an excellent way to sharpen an axe, lawnmower blades or yard tools. Pull the file across the face rather than taking full stokes at a 90 degree angle. Done this way a file can produce a raiser sharp edge on tool steel.

  3. #33
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    Cliff

    thanks you for info on how to sharpen the knifes
    going to get a stone soon

  4. #34
    BarnsleyBob is offline 'ello 'ello 'ello... Formerly Hellequin
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    Cheers Pete, a brilliant guide this. Not only for the technique but also for the pointers towards the right kit too.

    I got a couple of Japanese water stones for my birthday this year and I've now had a bit of practice with them, using my Helle Wind. The knife gets some good use in the field but a short session with the waterstones has it scary sharp again; good enough that it will take the hairs off my arm!

    ATB
    Paul
    Last edited by BarnsleyBob; 08-05-2009 at 11:28 AM.
    Wyrd bi ful ard

  5. #35
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    Thanks Pete, i have been struggling for years to get a decent edge, i tried your way and it works!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Kev

  6. #36
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    Glad it helped, Clangy, old thing.

  7. #37
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    clive, iowa, usa
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    Disc sharpeners

    I use an Ecko kitchen sharpener for most of my sharpening on knives, arrowheads and even machetes and axes.

    It consists of 8 interlocking discs of tool steel. Maybe not the best way, but the fastest and easiest. Used it for 40 yrs and bought a second at a yard sale. I cut the handle off the first one. The new one retains the handle for axes, machetes, entrenching tools and other large blades.

    I use the old fashioned if things get really dull.

    If you have a steel table, like in the restaurant biz or in a machine or wood shop, you can use it like stone as long as the table is not knicked.

    Brian
    Des Moines

  8. #38
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    ive made a few knives in the past based on the woodlore blade, and i hand sharpen on 4 grades of diamond stone then use a leather strop and paste to a razor edge, angled approx to 30 degrees

    pics are of an olive wood knife and firesteel i did for a mate

  9. #39
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  10. #40
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    Cheers

  11. #41
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    Gentlemen, a question. When using an old belt for stropping, is it best to use the burnished front of the belt or the sueded back of the belt? I've always assumed the back, but stand to be corrected.

    Si
    Brocock Atomic .177

  12. #42
    chris u'5 is offline I'm a dumbass, it's official!!
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    Great guide

    Thank you very much Sir, I'm gonna give it a try as I've always wondered what the correct method was.

    You learn something new everyday on the BBS

  13. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by skinhead View Post
    Gentlemen, a question. When using an old belt for stropping, is it best to use the burnished front of the belt or the sueded back of the belt? I've always assumed the back, but stand to be corrected.

    Si
    I'm sure it wouldn't make any difference, Si, but I always go for the suede side, as its surface 'picks up' if I have a burr on the steel.

    As this burr gets removed, the surface of the suede no longer gets picked up. In effect, the leather tells you about the edge of the knife.

    Pete.

  14. #44
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    Very useful , cheers

  15. #45
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    very interesting and informative thread cheers.

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