Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Rogers and Spencer .44

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    wolverhampton
    Posts
    500

    Rogers and Spencer .44

    I've had mine for about 6 months. Its a few years old and it's got a some marks but a good shooter and seems accurate. Trigger is especially good but it seems to be a feature of this Euroarms model. They are still available from Kranks for 7-800 but spares are no longer available. I've never seen an original model for sale, has anyone else? There were a lot made apparently.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    grantham
    Posts
    1,350
    Had mine about 14 years now. Have replaced the cylinder pin and the bolt i think its called. Both parts bought from Henry Kranks and where in stock.
    As you say the trigger is really nice on the Rogers and i like the slightly bigger grips. Over the years the gun has taken on a lovely used look and still
    functions as new although i don't use it much these days.
    Iv never seen an original either, seen a few original Remingtons but i suppose they will be out there somewhere. Tim

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Huntingdon
    Posts
    6,020
    Quote Originally Posted by CLINT3 View Post
    I've had mine for about 6 months. Its a few years old and it's got a some marks but a good shooter and seems accurate. Trigger is especially good but it seems to be a feature of this Euroarms model. They are still available from Kranks for 7-800 but spares are no longer available. I've never seen an original model for sale, has anyone else? There were a lot made apparently.
    I prefer the larger grips of the R&S - I have a set of Herrett's ambi wood grips on my ROA. BTW I paid $75 for my R&S from a fellow shooter in Eugene OR, about fifteen years ago, that too is a Navy Arms version and is still a good shooter, made in 1978, BTW.

    The price that you quote for a new replica is outrageous to say the least - they sell in Cabelas and Bass Pro for around $300. Right now Cabelas is doing a deal with the Colt Navy in .36 cal [correct] and .44cal [incorrect], for $275.00.

    I'd really like to get some of these UK dealers by the throat, that's a certainty.

    A genuine R&S is not as common as you'd imagine, and in spite of your comment there were only 5800 ever made, hence the high price of around $3500 -5000 stateside.

    tac
    Lots of guns and trains.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Reading, Berks
    Posts
    10,841
    A guy at our club has a real one. Had it imported from America. Been re-worked to bring it up to shooting standard, but not shot yet as not on ticket. Lovely looking pistol. I believe they were made at the end of the American civil war, but not used.
    And then an ice hockey game broke out: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G0woZ...layer_embedded
    son got MOM in world championships: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZoCcYwNJxv4

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Huntingdon
    Posts
    6,020
    The Rogers & Spencer Percussion Revolver was originally manufactured in Willowvale, NY about 1863-65. In January 1865, the United States government contracted with Rogers & Spencer for 5,800 of the solid frame pistols. Delivery on the contract was made too late for war service, and the entire lot was sold as scrap to Francis Bannerman and Son in 1901. Bannerman then sold the pistols throughout the first quarter of the 20th Century. Many original Rogers & Spencer revolvers are seen today in excellent, near mint condition.

    The Rogers and Spencer Army Model Revolver was actually an improvement of earlier pistols produced by the firm - the Pettingill and Freeman revolvers. The Pettingills were produced in the late 1850's and early 1860's, and were double action revolvers. The Pettingills were ahead of their time, being designed as hammerless pistols, which were popular in the last decade of the 19th Century, but certainly too avant garde for Army purchasers. The Navy Model was a .34 caliber, of which less than 1,000 were produced. The Army Model was a .44 caliber, and only about 3,400 were produced in the early 1860's. The Freeman Army Model Revolver was a solid frame .44 caliber pistol with a round 7 1/2" barrel, of which 2,000 are believed to have been produced in 1863-64, and in appearance the Freeman resembles a Starr Revolver.

    The Rogers & Spencer is an improved Freeman, with a less severe grip style, a heavier frame and a stronger octagon barrel of identical 7 1/2" length. Interestingly, the Rogers & Spencer design is eligible for N-SSA competitions because the contract was consummated before the end of hostilities.

    Now you know as much as me.

    tac
    Lots of guns and trains.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Liverpool
    Posts
    118

    R&S

    I have two R&S pistols one I bought on this site and the other at a gun show in America both shoot well but I prefer the English one as it is a bit more accurate I paid about $250 for one and 250 quid for the other, the America one has a bead foresight and the English one has a blade foresight and that's the only difference really

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    wolverhampton
    Posts
    500

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by tacfoley View Post
    The Rogers & Spencer Percussion Revolver was originally manufactured in Willowvale, NY about 1863-65. In January 1865, the United States government contracted with Rogers & Spencer for 5,800 of the solid frame pistols. Delivery on the contract was made too late for war service, and the entire lot was sold as scrap to Francis Bannerman and Son in 1901. Bannerman then sold the pistols throughout the first quarter of the 20th Century. Many original Rogers & Spencer revolvers are seen today in excellent, near mint condition.

    The Rogers and Spencer Army Model Revolver was actually an improvement of earlier pistols produced by the firm - the Pettingill and Freeman revolvers. The Pettingills were produced in the late 1850's and early 1860's, and were double action revolvers. The Pettingills were ahead of their time, being designed as hammerless pistols, which were popular in the last decade of the 19th Century, but certainly too avant garde for Army purchasers. The Navy Model was a .34 caliber, of which less than 1,000 were produced. The Army Model was a .44 caliber, and only about 3,400 were produced in the early 1860's. The Freeman Army Model Revolver was a solid frame .44 caliber pistol with a round 7 1/2" barrel, of which 2,000 are believed to have been produced in 1863-64, and in appearance the Freeman resembles a Starr Revolver.

    The Rogers & Spencer is an improved Freeman, with a less severe grip style, a heavier frame and a stronger octagon barrel of identical 7 1/2" length. Interestingly, the Rogers & Spencer design is eligible for N-SSA competitions because the contract was consummated before the end of hostilities.

    Now you know as much as me.

    tac
    I doubt that Mr Tac of knowledge. Respect.

    Anyway I saw my first real one on Sunday at the Shooting Show, Bonhams auction stand. I was going to ask them to let me handle it then decided they would probably take great enjoyment in telling me no.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Huntingdon
    Posts
    6,020
    Quote Originally Posted by CLINT3 View Post
    I doubt that Mr Tac of knowledge. Respect.

    Anyway I saw my first real one on Sunday at the Shooting Show, Bonhams auction stand. I was going to ask them to let me handle it then decided they would probably take great enjoyment in telling me no.
    Yup, the real deal, and not a lot more than a top-of-the-line Hege version either. Which would YOU have bought?

    tac
    Lots of guns and trains.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Dover
    Posts
    312
    Quote Originally Posted by Russell Start View Post
    I have two R&S pistols one I bought on this site and the other at a gun show in America both shoot well but I prefer the English one as it is a bit more accurate I paid about $250 for one and 250 quid for the other, the America one has a bead foresight and the English one has a blade foresight and that's the only difference really
    I think there are quite a few copies of the real one's floating around some of the major players from 1970s onward banged them out they were dirt cheap preasent day as found a marked increase my one is in London grey
    And as a walther barrel fitted at euroarms you realy have to watch what you are buying 2nd hand wise so easy to end up with a lemon from the 70s era o yes mine cost pre 20%vat 750 from Henry Kranks so the difference is not just the sights
    Ex Royal Navy Retired have fun while it lasts."I Do"
    B.S.A.R Member

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •