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Thread: Air Arms springer - .177 or .22?

  1. #1
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    Air Arms springer - .177 or .22?

    On the assumption I can sell off 1 or 2 pieces of kit,I am toying with the idea of buying a springer.
    I've never fired one in over 30 years and when I came back to shooting bought a PCP.
    Now, I think it might be nice to try the real thing - a springer and will be looking again at Air Arms TX200hc or Prosport in all likelihood.
    My plan is to use it to shoot PL14 targets at 20 yards and maybe 25 metres plus possibly culling some magpies/crows in my garden at a maximum distance of 20 yards.
    My question is whether .177 has any advantage over .22.
    Will it really be more accurate for targets at the distances mentioned above?
    Any difference for pests - it seems the current view is not really any difference?
    Is it that easier to cock a rifle in .22 calibre as opposed to .177 and is it easier to shoot?
    Given my advancing years and arthritic hands it might be conceivably easier to load a .22.
    Any thoughts or advice would be gratefully appreciated.
    Many thanks.

  2. #2
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    At less than 35 yards .177" has nothing but disadvantages.
    Both calibres are the same regarding accuracy
    In the same gun .22 is smoother to shoot than .177 at the same power
    It is also easier to cock
    There is no real trajectory advantage for either at that range
    .22 pellets are easier to pick up and load.
    .22 pellets are less likely to overpenetrate live targets at close range
    Last edited by tinbum; 12-09-2017 at 04:28 PM.
    Cogito ergo sum rectum!

  3. #3
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    theres a old saying .177 for feathers and .22 for fur,if ya just want shoot magpies/woodies bit target practice then id say .177 i have two .177 and a .22 and i like .177 better.

  4. #4
    jeff0100 is offline ...I have a very unusual chopper, actually.
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    Quote Originally Posted by creed View Post
    On the assumption I can sell off 1 or 2 pieces of kit,I am toying with the idea of buying a springer.
    I've never fired one in over 30 years and when I came back to shooting bought a PCP.
    Now, I think it might be nice to try the real thing - a springer and will be looking again at Air Arms TX200hc or Prosport in all likelihood.
    My plan is to use it to shoot PL14 targets at 20 yards and maybe 25 metres plus possibly culling some magpies/crows in my garden at a maximum distance of 20 yards.
    My question is whether .177 has any advantage over .22.
    Will it really be more accurate for targets at the distances mentioned above?
    Any difference for pests - it seems the current view is not really any difference?
    Is it that easier to cock a rifle in .22 calibre as opposed to .177 and is it easier to shoot?
    Given my advancing years and arthritic hands it might be conceivably easier to load a .22.
    Any thoughts or advice would be gratefully appreciated.
    Many thanks.
    The ProSport under lever may be a bit uncomfortable for you. Try before you buy. http://bagnallandkirkwood.co.uk/prod...ring-air-rifle

    If you check out the photo's you can see that the under lever is very square, with sharpish edges. I'm sure I've seen on here somewhere that the newer ones have been slightly rounded off, but still best to check it out.
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  5. #5
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    Surely if the spring is the same for both calibres (and as far as I know it is for out of the box guns), the cocking effort is the same for both ... except that I can see that if .177 needs more preload then there will be a small increase in effort needed. Personally I have never noticed a difference in cocking effort but agree that in general a .22 can be 'more comfortable' to shoot cf .177.

    .177 pellets are usually cheaper than .22
    Trajectory is flatter so it could be argued that .177 is the easier to shoot as range estimation is more critical for .22. Not sure this is valid though as I know some exceedingly good .22 shooters (they are also good .177 as well) so I guess it all comes down to knowing your kit and your ranges.
    Fur & feather: limited experience tells me there is no difference. Both do the job if pellet is placed correctly.Others may disagree.

    Just thoughts,
    Cheers, Phil

  6. #6
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    Go for the .22 without doubt
    Put on heading 270, assume attack formation

  7. #7
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    For the purpose described, either calibre will easily do the job. .177 pellets are cheaper, but .22 pellets might be easier for you to load...

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by rabbitwrecker View Post
    For the purpose described, either calibre will easily do the job. .177 pellets are cheaper, but .22 pellets might be easier for you to load...
    He's not a skin-flint, He's buying an Air Arms, not an HW99!
    Cogito ergo sum rectum!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by tinbum View Post
    At less than 35 yards .177" has nothing but disadvantages.
    Both calibres are the same regarding accuracy
    In the same gun .22 is smoother to shoot than .177 at the same power
    It is also easier to cock
    There is no real trajectory advantage for either at that range
    .22 pellets are easier to pick up and load.
    .22 pellets are less likely to overpenetrate live targets at close range
    Well, there are lots of opinions on this but you really need to try before you buy. Based on my own experience of owning a TX in both calibres I would not necessarily agree with points 1, 3, 4 and 5 (above).

    I've never managed to get within 20 yards of a magpie or crow though... magpies seem to drop very easily; crows much tougher.

    The best solution is to go for a .20 of course

  10. #10
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    With a factory spring I mesuared the cocking effort of my .177 HC at 28 lbs perhaps someone can post the cocking effort of a .22 this might help you make up your mind

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Russell View Post
    Surely if the spring is the same for both calibres (and as far as I know it is for out of the box guns), the cocking effort is the same for both ... except that I can see that if .177 needs more preload then there will be a small increase in effort needed. Personally I have never noticed a difference in cocking effort but agree that in general a .22 can be 'more comfortable' to shoot cf .177.

    )
    If I remember correctly, Phil, although the spring may well be the same, the top hats will have different dimensions, increasing/decreasing piston weight and preload, as you describe.

    OP - although many don't have an issue cocking even the .177 HC, if lighter cocking is desirable, maybe consider the .22 full length version?

    But, as Mike says, better to try a few out (maybe even different makes if you're open to that idea).
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barryg View Post
    With a factory spring I mesuared the cocking effort of my .177 HC at 28 lbs perhaps someone can post the cocking effort of a .22 this might help you make up your mind
    Good information ... but to make an accurate comparison can you tell us where along the u/l you measured the effort required.
    For example: a scale placed at the very end of the u/l will record less than a scale placed half way along.
    Cheers, Phil

  13. #13
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    [QUOTE=TonyL;7336659]If I remember correctly, Phil, although the spring may well be the same, the top hats will have different dimensions, increasing/decreasing piston weight and preload, as you describe.

    Whoops, yes, I had forgotten that. Senior moment again. Thanks for the reminder TonyL.
    Cheers, Phil

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Russell View Post
    Good information ... but to make an accurate comparison can you tell us where along the u/l you measured the effort required.
    For example: a scale placed at the very end of the u/l will record less than a scale placed half way along.
    Cheers, Phil
    Yes I used bathroom scales at the end of the lever.

  15. #15
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    Thanks for the input,gents.
    Food for thought - I'll try cocking one or two rifles and that might give me more of an idea.
    The forward load position on the TW200 will probably suit me;at least it's not under the scope.
    Thanks to you all again.

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