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Thread: Gunsmith's Screwdrivers ?

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    Newport, Gwent
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    726
    Wheeler make gunsmiths screwdriver set , you can get different size sets. I have used them for years with no problems.
    .22 Venom Mach 1 (FAC) 6-25x56 Millett.
    .22 Venom Mach 2 Thumbhole 6.5-20x40 Leupold EFR.
    .22 Venom Mach 2 Sporter 4-12x40 Leupold.
    .177 Venom Vantage 4-16x50.
    .177 Venom Daystate 8-32x56 AGS.
    .22 Venom Datstate 4-16x56 AGS.
    .22 Webley Venom FX2000 6-18x40 Busnel Legend.
    .177 Titan MPT by Steve Pope 6-24x40 Tasco.
    .177 Pro-Sport 4-16x50.
    .22 Webley FX2000 3-9x33 Leupold EFR.
    .177 Logan Solo 4-16x50.
    .22 HW90 (spring powered) 4-16x50
    .22 Gamo Stutzen.
    .177 Walther lever action.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
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    Paisley, Renfrewshire, Scotland.
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    +1 for the bsquare set. I have this and for the price they are excellent. A good variety of hollow ground bits and the extras.
    I have a browning auto 5 which has screws with very thin and wide slots - this set works a treat. I think it's about 30 quid
    Donald

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Exeter
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    20,223
    Brownells sell Bondhus sets which are usually good gear.
    You could try looking for "Aircraft quality" tools from general suppliers but they tend to be way pricy as does anything marked for Aircraft use.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Nottingham
    Posts
    123
    I have a Chapman set, American made but I got it from someone in UK (Sorry, cant remember who). Fairly comprehensive set of hollow ground bits, but I still occasionally find a screw I can't match. For guns which I strip regularly I try to fit screws with allen heads wherever possible - saves loads of hassle.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Chelmsford
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    586
    Quote Originally Posted by Blackrider View Post
    I need a set of the above, so does anyone know of a good source ?
    Thanks.
    I found these at a Boot Sale for 2 a good buy in my opinion.

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/fronte...57629553489887

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Ashford
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    214

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by venoman View Post
    Wheeler make gunsmiths screwdriver set , you can get different size sets. I have used them for years with no problems.
    I picked up a set of these from 1967spud (reloading supply website) last year.
    Excellent set with a bit for every occasion and the option to use them with torq drivers.

    Also very friendly chap runs the site, top service.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
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    Bath
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    Quote Originally Posted by rancidtom View Post
    I've made my own similar to those you can buy and I've also modified Stanley and Wera screwdrivers to fit correctly with diamond files or slow wet grinding so there's no need to anneal then re-harden and temper. I've found the old pre WW2 to 1960's Stanleys to be probably the best (toughest) steel around, some of the modern stuff even from quality manufacturers doesn't hold a candle to the old steels. Some people say it's because of various bombs going off that contaminated post war steels however I just think the post 1960 steels are usually inferior possibly because of other contaminants in recycled steels. I'm not a metallurgist I just know enough to get by to heat treat carbon and alloy steels without destroying them. Wera seem to be around the best of the modern steels for screwdriver and hex bit manufacture.
    It's actually true Tom... Pre nuclear steel commands a high price because of its non contaminated structure. I remember when they sold an old dry dock gate from Portsmouth naval base for loads of money because it was made from 40's steel. Look here;
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Low-background_steel

    I'd hold on to those screwdrivers if I were you
    "its hard being a modest genius. "
    Theoben Evo .22 - Meopta 6x42 4b, DS huntsman classic .177 - Vortex Viper 4-12x40pa BDC, BSA R10 mk2 .22 - Meopta 4x32 4A, and at request of Tony L, HW77 forest green - Docter zf 6x42.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
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    Hollesley, near Woodbridge
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vernal View Post
    I have a Chapman set
    Me too, bought in the early 80's and still have them
    ISP Spartan .22 Theoben E Type .22 Custom BSA S10 .22 PAX Phoenix Mk 2 .22 Custom Titan Manitou .22 (JB BP) HW77 .22 FWB Sport Mk1 .22 Crossman 600 .22 Berretta 92 .20

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Ashford
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    Quote Originally Posted by rancidtom View Post
    I've made my own similar to those you can buy and I've also modified Stanley and Wera screwdrivers to fit correctly with diamond files or slow wet grinding so there's no need to anneal then re-harden and temper. I've found the old pre WW2 to 1960's Stanleys to be probably the best (toughest) steel around, some of the modern stuff even from quality manufacturers doesn't hold a candle to the old steels. Some people say it's because of various bombs going off that contaminated post war steels however I just think the post 1960 steels are usually inferior possibly because of other contaminants in recycled steels. I'm not a metallurgist I just know enough to get by to heat treat carbon and alloy steels without destroying them. Wera seem to be around the best of the modern steels for screwdriver and hex bit manufacture.
    The pre war steel is valuable only in the science industry.
    It does not posses magical mechanical strength; it lacks radioactive contamination.

    Steels which were produced and stored in a protected way (under water) prior to 1945 have a lower level of background radiation in them, this is vital if you are building instruments which are highly sensitive to radioactivity.

    If you want a great read then look into the German Imperial fleet which the British captured at the end of WW1.
    the fleet was interned at Scapa Flow and scuttled by the german crews - Some of it is now on a trip into the depths of universe, it has been used for high precision instruments for decades and was the source of the steel used in the construction of the Voyager spacecraft.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Manchester
    Posts
    453
    It's probably that I notice the differences in post 1960's steel related to pre- and immediately post WW2 that are maybe more due to manufacturing and refining differences. These days we have numerous special recipe steels claimed to be better than traditional carbon steels. Chrome, vanadium, molybdenum, nickel, tungsten, titanium and other elements added to iron to supposedly make it longer lasting, hold a better edge, be more corrosion resistant, less brittle, tougher... I do think quite a lot of it is marketing hype as I can make a screwdriver from a bar of tool steel that will perform as well as some of the expensive "best ever" screwdrivers you can buy with all their fancy alloy claims.
    Correct fit and profile of the blade, finish is important too as grinding/filing marks can be a useful aid to help prevent cam-out but the hollow ground profile is the biggest contributor to anticam-out. It also extends the life of the screw head.
    BSA Super10 addict, various other BSA's, Original (Diana) Mod75's, Diana Mod5, HW80's, SAM 11K... The collection keeps expanding!

  11. #26
    Hsing-ee is offline I don't have the slightest association with the lingerie industry
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    Quote Originally Posted by RichardH View Post
    Professional job, professional tools

    http://www.brownells.com/gunsmith-to...prod78280.aspx
    Those are The Ones To Get ..

    ' And, the ideal parallel section is ground at the tip to fit the screw slot properly through the full width and depth of the slot. This is what keeps you from buggering screws - a blade tip that evenly distributes the turning torque applied at the handle to the full width and depth of the screw slot.'

  12. #27
    Blackrider is offline It don't mean a thing, if it ain't got a Spring
    Join Date
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    Great advice, thanks Chaps !

    Not sure what Ill get yet but there's some quality kit here !
    "When you can't see the light at the end of the tunnel, get up and switch it on yourself" !

  13. #28
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Wolverhampton
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    3,543
    With Rancid turnscrews pretty easy to make better than anything available having tried many of the so called ultimate from around the world inc US.

    Pachmayer are soft as with most of above listed, fine for diy, pro forget it. Will spend more time filing them up than using.

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