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Thread: Never under estimate the power of a BSA MP

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    Never under estimate the power of a BSA MP


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    I think this pic was painted to commemorate the bravery of a farmer who was a member of the Local Defence Volunteers. One day he was buzzed by Nazi plane being hotly pursued by an RAF fighter, when doing target practice with the Force's Military Pattern, donated by a local landowner.

    According to crash investigators the farmer took a potshot and the pellet went up through the light canvas fuselage, causing a nasty welt on the pilot's right hand. He snatched his hand off the rudder and crashed, dying instantly.

    There's some confusion over what exactly happened because the RAF pilot was also shooting at the time and claimed the kill, but we know who to beiieve.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Garvin View Post
    I think this pic was painted to commemorate the bravery of a farmer who was a member of the Local Defence Volunteers. One day he was buzzed by Nazi plane being hotly pursued by an RAF fighter, when doing target practice with the Force's Military Pattern, donated by a local landowner.

    According to crash investigators the farmer took a potshot and the pellet went up through the light canvas fuselage, causing a nasty welt on the pilot's right hand. He snatched his hand off the rudder and crashed, dying instantly.

    There's some confusion over what exactly happened because the RAF pilot was also shooting at the time and claimed the kill, but we know who to beiieve.
    I imagine thatís a story to boost morale. The ME 109 had an all metal stressed skin construction. AFAIK the only canvas skinned fighter in the Battle of Britain was the Hurricane, and I hope he didnít shoot one of those down.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Cornelius View Post
    I imagine thatís a story to boost morale. The ME 109 had an all metal stressed skin construction. AFAIK the only canvas skinned fighter in the Battle of Britain was the Hurricane, and I hope he didnít shoot one of those down.
    No, Not listening to that JC.

    That Military Pattern .177 claimed the kill, finding a small gap in the cockpit widow, he took the headshot, allowing a lead of 20yards, with a slight westerly.

    Who do you think you are kidding......

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    That stories up there with the elephant hunting one with a .25 Improved Model D Airgun World ran years ago.

    Wasn't there a similar story about a Webley pistol shooting down the R101.
    Last edited by coburn; 22-02-2021 at 11:00 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jerry Cornelius View Post
    I imagine thatís a story to boost morale. The ME 109 had an all metal stressed skin construction. AFAIK the only canvas skinned fighter in the Battle of Britain was the Hurricane, and I hope he didnít shoot one of those down.
    That was my reaction too.

    And, from my little time years ago in the cockpit, the rudder is normally controlled by foot pedals.

    Sorry.

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    As a lover of all things vintage BSA, I think the story is perfectly believable.

    There are a few things that people need to remember

    1) The Mil Patt is a legendary gun, and really does possess legendary power

    2) the .177 pellet would have been needed, as it flies straighter, and is smaller to sneak in between the metal panels of the 109

    3) It probably had a full length Titan Spring in it

    4) No Chronographs in those days

    5) With a Spit on his tail, the Jerry pilot would have been nervous and hot, so is almost certainly gonna have his side window open for more ventilation. That will be where the pellet got in to the cockpit.

    6) The ME109 looks well within the published 60 yd range.

    I rest my case !

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    micky2 is offline The collector formerly known as micky
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    Just looked out my window and there is a load of pigs flying around. (in formation).

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    I remember Mr D on BBS. Was he the one who eliminated all the rogue elephants in Surbiton using his Airsporter? He must have done a good job because I never hear about the people of Surbiton being terrorised by rampaging pachyderms.

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    keith66 is offline Optimisic Pessimist Fella
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    I'm sure i have seen a version of that picture before in one of the Just William books, in that case William aged about 12 engaged the Me109 with a BSA standard, see if i can find it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lakey View Post
    As a lover of all things vintage BSA, I think the story is perfectly believable.

    There are a few things that people need to remember

    1) The Mil Patt is a legendary gun, and really does possess legendary power

    2) the .177 pellet would have been needed, as it flies straighter, and is smaller to sneak in between the metal panels of the 109

    3) It probably had a full length Titan Spring in it

    4) No Chronographs in those days

    5) With a Spit on his tail, the Jerry pilot would have been nervous and hot, so is almost certainly gonna have his side window open for more ventilation. That will be where the pellet got in to the cockpit.

    6) The ME109 looks well within the published 60 yd range.

    I rest my case !
    All correct.....Once lockdown is over, anyone interested can actually view the pellet remnant (think it was an Adder) and a statement from the Air Ministry and even a note from the unlucky pilot an Oberstleutnant Von Barring (lots of "Gott in Himmels" etc. no doubt ).....as they are all on display with a recovered part of the aircraft at the Cobbaton Combat Collection Umberleigh EX37 9RZ...where they have been for at least 20 years.

    ATB, Ed

































































    (I may have made some of that up!)

    ATB, ED

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    Quote Originally Posted by Binners View Post
    No, Not listening to that JC.

    That Military Pattern .177 claimed the kill, finding a small gap in the cockpit widow, he took the headshot, allowing a lead of 20yards, with a slight westerly.

    Who do you think you are kidding......
    forgive my ignorance but were they bolt action ?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Binners View Post
    No, Not listening to that JC.

    That Military Pattern .177 claimed the kill, finding a small gap in the cockpit widow, he took the headshot, allowing a lead of 20yards, with a slight westerly.

    Who do you think you are kidding......
    Another possibility is Jerry was a collector, spotted the legendary Milpat BSA, and became so excited and distracted he forgot what he was doing and flew into the ground.

    A recognised anti air technique later known as the ďBarbara WindsorĒ though of course I have no idea why.
    The miserable man and evil minded, makes of all things mockery,
    and knows not that which he best should know,
    that he is not free from faults.

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    edbear2 is offline Cut 'n shut Beezer airgun Geezer
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    Quote Originally Posted by loiner1965 View Post
    forgive my ignorance but were they bolt action ?
    No, it was a BSA Improved Model air rifle action similar in most respects to the normal 1905-1981 patterns but had the following mods;

    An extended cast steel breech / trigger block assembly complete with non working fixed bolt, a Service rifle stock, service type sights (sightbar is interchangeble with the Service rifle with the upright having different graduations ), a unique trigger guard that is close to the service one plus extended trigger to clear the woodwork, wooden fore end to replicate the look and feel of the service rifle to an extent that they were advertised and sold / given to some regiments / cadet forces as training aids.

    Pics here of one in bits shows the unique to the model parts;

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/312284...57627403551588

    The hinged trigger shown is a one off (by possibly a military forces amourer) to replicate a 2 stage trigger, normal Milpats have a solid trigger.

    ATB, Ed

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    I think I would have been too worried about friendly fire from the Spit.....

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