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Thread: licence

  1. #1
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    licence

    Hi. What licence is required to own and shoot an original black powder muzzle loading revolver in the UK
    Thanks
    When I die don't let my wife sell my guns for what she thinks I gave for them!!!

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    To own an antique firearm needs no licence and no storage security

    To shoot requires a section 1 certificate and a suitable gunsafe. There is a small technicality in that originals may be shot "for testing purposes" without a certificate but finding a venue which will allow is not so easy.

    To possess Black Powder requires an Explosives Licence and a suitable powder storage box.

    Would recommend against using BP substitutes in an original.

    Would recommend appropriate examination of the gun prior to using to be sure it is sound and in proof.
    True freedom includes the freedom to make mistakes or do foolish things and bear the consequences.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Turnup View Post
    To own an antique firearm needs no licence and no storage security

    To shoot requires a section 1 certificate and a suitable gunsafe. There is a small technicality in that originals may be shot "for testing purposes" without a certificate but finding a venue which will allow is not so easy.

    To possess Black Powder requires an Explosives Licence and a suitable powder storage box.

    Would recommend against using BP substitutes in an original.

    Would recommend appropriate examination of the gun prior to using to be sure it is sound and in proof.
    explained perfectly above
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  4. #4
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    Revolver

    Thanks. I do have a black powder licence. I also shoot an antique percussion shotgun but wondered about revolvers.
    When I die don't let my wife sell my guns for what she thinks I gave for them!!!

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Turnup View Post
    There is a small technicality in that originals may be shot "for testing purposes" without a certificate but finding a venue which will allow is not so easy.
    I've heard that a number of times but never found any reference in the firearms acts, could you give any more details?

    Daz

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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Dunkley View Post
    Thanks. I do have a black powder licence. I also shoot an antique percussion shotgun but wondered about revolvers.
    A revolver [usually] has a rifled barrel. ALL firearms with rifled barrels that you wish to shoot, as opposed to admire, require a Section 1 FAC and all that goes with it. For the purpose of this context I'll ignore that in the UK even an airgun is often described as a firearm, particularly by police authorities claiming them as such when portraying the successes of arms amnesties.

    1. Full membership of a gun club - this is even BEFORE you can apply for your FAC. Just don't be in a rush.

    2. A secure place to store it when not in use - displaying a Section 1 firearm, even an antique, is a no-no in this country. Commercially-made gun cabinets of a size to hold a few handguns are not expensive.

    Everything else has been covered here in the posts above mine.
    Last edited by tacfoley; 04-03-2021 at 10:52 AM.

  7. #7
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    One additional point. You speak of revolver but did not specify precisely. I assumes revolving pistol but revolving shotguns (rare but they do exist) are (I think) OK as antiques but may not be fired.
    True freedom includes the freedom to make mistakes or do foolish things and bear the consequences.
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  8. #8
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    Revolver

    Thank you all. I did fancy a black powder revolver but as you suggest it will be rifled so needing sect 1 which I dont intend to go into.
    Thanks again.
    When I die don't let my wife sell my guns for what she thinks I gave for them!!!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Dunkley View Post
    Thank you all. I did fancy a black powder revolver but as you suggest it will be rifled so needing sect 1 which I dont intend to go into.
    Thanks again.
    Rifled or not makes no difference re pistols and licencing.

    Muzzle loading long guns which are smooth do gain a rather quirky exemption that they may be owned and used (even with bullet or single ball) under S2 licence.
    True freedom includes the freedom to make mistakes or do foolish things and bear the consequences.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Turnup View Post
    There is a small technicality in that originals may be shot "for testing purposes" without a certificate but finding a venue which will allow is not so easy.

    No there is not any such "technicality". To shoot a firearm or shotgun held under the auspices of s58, or even indication of intent to do so, would categorise the firearm/gun as s1 or s2 and would require all of the relevant certification.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by tacfoley View Post
    For the purpose of this context I'll ignore that in the UK even an airgun is often described as a firearm, particularly by police authorities claiming them as such when portraying the successes of arms amnesties.
    That's because air-weapons do fall under the Firearms Act. It's just that those not declared specially dangerous by the Home Secretary are exempted from FAC controls, generally declared around muzzle energy limits. But as far as U.K. law is concerned, they are definitely controlled as per s1 and are defined as such by the virtues of s57. Hence, they are firearms.

  12. #12
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    Testing off ticket

    I have looked through "Guidance.." and can find no mention of off ticket testing. I am pretty sure it used to be there and I wonder if the HO have simply left it off in later editions. The only way to know for sure would be to look at the actual law which would be a monumental task because it is spread over multiple acts.
    True freedom includes the freedom to make mistakes or do foolish things and bear the consequences.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Turnup View Post
    I have looked through "Guidance.." and can find no mention of off ticket testing. I am pretty sure it used to be there and I wonder if the HO have simply left it off in later editions. The only way to know for sure would be to look at the actual law which would be a monumental task because it is spread over multiple acts.

    Home Office Guidance Chapter 8, Antique Firearms. Paras 8.1, 8.2 and 8.8.

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