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Thread: Freshest example of a prewar air rifle?

  1. #1
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    Freshest example of a prewar air rifle?

    I don't think I've ever seen such a 'factory fresh' example of a pre-WW2 air rifle! Unless it's an incredible restoration, and I can't see any evidence of it from the pics. It was unsold recently after being posted on eGun.de for about £1,000.

    https://forum.vintageairgunsgallery....ary/#post-6767
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  2. #2
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    Wow. I think I’d have assumed that was expertly refinished.

    Not casting any aspersions. There are plenty of firearms older than that Mars in similar “mint” condition.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geezer View Post
    Wow. I think I’d have assumed that was expertly refinished.

    Not casting any aspersions. There are plenty of firearms older than that Mars in similar “mint” condition.
    There's only one person I know with the nous to do a restoration this good (see Airgun Collector issue 2) and I'm pretty sure it's not one of his creations.
    Vintage Airguns Gallery
    ..Above link posted with permission from Gareth W-B
    In British slang an anorak is a person who has a very strong interest in niche subjects.

  4. #4
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    Mars rifle.

    Unbelievable never seen one before thank you for posting it a thing of beauty Wow.

  5. #5
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    I'm going with an excellent restoration. The bolt handle has clearly been polished as has the tang safety catch. On an original 'mint' rifle, even if unused, they would be tarnished by time alone.
    The gaps in the wood either side of the action don't look right for a 'new' gun?

    The stock would have some even minor indentations and discolouration, again just through the passage of time of lying around. Even if a mechanical object is unused, it will still show evidence of the years - eg congealed and dried grease around the bolt/spring etc.

    This has had some hours spent on it, and a really excellent re finish ?

  6. #6
    micky2 is offline The collector formerly known as micky
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    When you look at the close ups it is not so mint as it seems. the one where it shows the Mars stamping you can see some pitting on there. and the other close ups the blueing don't look so mint either. so maybe the post above is right about a very good refinish. just my take on it.

  7. #7
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    Looks right to me?, polishing to me doesn’t hurt the gun though I wouldn’t do it. I tend to clean and wax guns and they can come off this good if you have a as new example. The perfect wood does cause me concern? I have a 1939 CZ VZ35 very close to mint but the wood shows some natural handing marks, though the metal is close to perfect. I think I’m talking myself out of a totally mint example? I think the wood had some help?

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    Wooden plug.

    I wonder why there is a wooden plug just behind the trigger guard ? If it is a repair or a strengthening screw points to some sympathetic refinishing as it is well finished and level with the rest of the stock.
    Anyway, a very nice example although a tad expensive.

  9. #9
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    I go with Mick's take on it. There is evidence of pitting. especially on the polished butt plate, even on the screws. The wood is simply too fresh, refinish to this standard should not be too difficult for a professional. Nevertheless, very nice example.
    Collection: vintage air pistols & air rifles / vintage air gun accessories
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  10. #10
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    When I looked at the first few pictures I thought it had a crack on the pistol grip then when I saw it had been plugged a few pictures down it confirmed it, and to me the blueing does not look right, still a nice restoration though.
    Last edited by jjjjjj; 02-12-2021 at 11:54 AM.

  11. #11
    keith66 is offline Optimisic Pessimist Fella
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    Quote Originally Posted by cordite50 View Post
    I wonder why there is a wooden plug just behind the trigger guard ? If it is a repair or a strengthening screw points to some sympathetic refinishing as it is well finished and level with the rest of the stock.
    Anyway, a very nice example although a tad expensive.
    If you look closely there would seem to be a faint crack along the grain through the wrist of the stock, i would think its been repaired & that plug behind the trigger guard conceals one of the screws. Its almost certainly been sanded down & refinished.
    Butt plate has been polished but it hasnt removed the pitting.
    Nice rifle but it aint mint.

  12. #12
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    Yes, looking closely at the pics, which I hadn't done, I would agree that the stock was cracked and repaired, although nicely done.

    As Chris says, the fact it doesn't have evidence of natural ageing after 90 years proves it's been refinished to some degree. The stock repair possibly prompted the refinishing.

    It must have been otherwise a very nice example because the lettering is so sharp and there's no sign of it having been made shallower. I particularly like that the blueing is grey-blue and not black-blue.

    It's would be odd if the little patch of pitting was still there after being polished and reblued?
    Vintage Airguns Gallery
    ..Above link posted with permission from Gareth W-B
    In British slang an anorak is a person who has a very strong interest in niche subjects.

  13. #13
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    Wood

    Any ideas on what the wood is ? Beech, oak, ash ?

  14. #14
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    I think its elm, a few of the german military trainers are found with elm stocks.
    "helplessly they stare at his tracks......."

  15. #15
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    I suspect this rifle started out as in exceptional condition, and then given a thorough clean, polish, and maybe retouch. Just sometimes such guns are put away correctly, wiped down with oil, and stored in the right conditions, so they come out 20, 50, 80 years on very clean and tidy. They invariably pick up something. Small spot of pitting, just something. Given a thorough clean they look very tidy. Interestingly they will have matured with age and don't quite look factory, some kind of change from the day they came out of the factory. Factory can seem rougher than a rifle that has been cleaned a few times.

    Factory paraffin waxed in waxed paper for storage can produce the most factory as can be found, even after years and years. Even the wood has little age depth to it. So new they can often look as if they have lost something; they seem unloved as they missed all those years of being caressed

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