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Thread: Scope levels

  1. #1
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    Scope levels

    Hi all, after messing about with Crosmans and collecting Umarex replicas for many years I have got myself my first springer, an SFS Chieftain. I have shot it out to about 15 yards at home and it's a lot of fun so far but recoil is something I need to get used to! I'm wanting to get it set up as nicely as I can and was looking for a couple of recommendations. Firstly a gun vice that's not going to break the bank so I can tinker with it safely and secondly a level or set of levels I can use to get the scope set up properly. Planning on taking it to the range on Monday to push it out to 55 yards and see what it (or I) can do!

  2. #2
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    The Chieftain is an HW97 based gun isn't it? There's not too many flat horizontal surfaces on the 97. You might have to try to eyeball the gun being upright and use a plumb line to set the scope square, or perhaps the edge of a door frame if your house is better built than mine.
    Best Regards

    Simon

    I've got some slug guns.

  3. #3
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    Scope info

    This may help as this site has a lot of excellent scope info. https://www.rimfirecentral.com/threa...y-here.496141/

  4. #4
    Jesim1's Avatar
    Jesim1 is offline Can juggle 3 pineapples but not 4!!!!
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    Try this for a work bench to hold your gun:

    https://www.philipmorrisdirect.co.uk...582466738aeb5d

    And try these for setting up your scope, I got 10 of a similar spec and measured them all against each other and an iPhone's in built spirit level, then I kept 6 which were all agreeing, and binned the others as they were out - it's worth it at this price

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Picture-Han...y%2C44&sr=1-12

    You can always find a small flat bit to get your scope levelled, even on a 97

    I'll be an Air-Gun God when I master the 4th Pineapple!

  5. #5
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    Ex founder & secretary of Rivington Riflemen.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by I. J. View Post
    Quite correct. Scope levels are a complete waste of time and money. If you believe you can set up a scope to be true to level and plumb you are sadly mistaken. The reasons being is that the small levels are so inaccurate and too short to give a meaningful reading off any of the narrow surface areas found on a gun. Those that fit around a scope are even worse as to set them correctly you need a datum and there is not one. If there is a need to 'level' a scope, align the vertical cross hair with a plumbline or the corner of a building. In doing this, it can only tell you that the crosshair is vertical and not that the gun is level across its axis asthe scope has revolved slightly in the scope cradle and the rifle is not necessarily level, no datum, no good.

  7. #7
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    Ex founder & secretary of Rivington Riflemen.
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  8. #8
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    Thanks very much for all the input. And the level based puns! I totally get what's been said about the accuracy of smaller levels etc but I'd still like to give it a go. There is a flat spot on the stock at the back of the action so would use this as a level point. As for my door frames my house is 120 odd years old so I'm thinking they might not be true! Will have a look at those recommendations and see how I get on. Cheers all

  9. #9
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    One thing to try is, if you have a perfectly level worktop or bench then using a carpenters square lined up with the recoil pad screws can sometimes be an option.

    Another is by using a piece of flat bar, say 1/8th or 1/4 inch by a foot or so, and balancing this on your known flat on the rifle. This allows you to use a slightly larger, and closer to accurate, level. You just extend the flat bar as a counter balance against the level.

    Finally, when you know your rifle is level it's best to set the scope using a plumb line.

    Not very scientific I know but it gets you close enough for the real world.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4end View Post
    Quite correct. Scope levels are a complete waste of time and money. If you believe you can set up a scope to be true to level and plumb you are sadly mistaken. The reasons being is that the small levels are so inaccurate and too short to give a meaningful reading off any of the narrow surface areas found on a gun. Those that fit around a scope are even worse as to set them correctly you need a datum and there is not one. If there is a need to 'level' a scope, align the vertical cross hair with a plumbline or the corner of a building. In doing this, it can only tell you that the crosshair is vertical and not that the gun is level across its axis asthe scope has revolved slightly in the scope cradle and the rifle is not necessarily level, no datum, no good.
    Au contraire. The only datum which matters is the scope tube above the bore. This is why I use one of these.
    https://www.brownells.co.uk/EXD-ENGI...CLE-INSTRUMENT

    Then I set one of the levels that fit around the tube to agree with the instrument.

    The narrow block self centres on the barrel (or action of a springer). The wide block self centres on the end of the objective lens
    We are too much accustomed to attribute to a single cause that which is the product of several, and the majority of our controversies come from that. - Marcus Aurelius

  11. #11
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    Rifle/scope level

    Hang a line or small diameter rope from a tree limb, with a medium weight, out 20/30 meters and this will give you a perfectly vertical reference for your scope. Align your scope using bags on a table and some folks use the center line of the butt pad or any other flat surface on the rifle to position the rifle level in a vertical position. You are now able to align your scope to your vertical reference line/rope. Position your scope and tighten screws/bolts in a round robin fashion to the manufactures specs which are usually 15/18 in/lbs.

    My personal opinion is that this adjustment is NOT that critical with pellet rifles and only comes into play with PB past 400/600 meters.

  12. #12
    Jesim1's Avatar
    Jesim1 is offline Can juggle 3 pineapples but not 4!!!!
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    Im surprised at some of these responses to be honest, many seem to completely miss the point that a bubble level not only gives you a good help in getting your rifle and scope level - although I agree its not perfect (happy to get a perfect workable solution from the doubters mind ) - but it also gives you consistency shot to shot, which is better than no measure of consistency is it not

    I guess all those companies like Tier One and Daystate etc are wrong to put these in there products, and those on this thread know far better?

    Who would have thought it

    James
    I'll be an Air-Gun God when I master the 4th Pineapple!

  13. #13
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    Didn't the HFT lads ban spirit leveles for several years because they were an advantage?
    Ex founder & secretary of Rivington Riflemen.
    www.rivington-riflemen.uk

  14. #14
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    Who can't see within a degree when your crosshairs aren't level just by looking down the stock

    Similarly who can't see when their crosshairs aren't level in the scope within a degree or two

    Finally, who can focus on three things at once - Target, Crosshairs and a Spirit level?

    Not convinced by them...

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by harvey_s View Post
    Who can't see within a degree when your crosshairs aren't level just by looking down the stock

    Similarly who can't see when their crosshairs aren't level in the scope within a degree or two

    Finally, who can focus on three things at once - Target, Crosshairs and a Spirit level?

    Not convinced by them...
    I'm with you on that..

    I just adjust my scope so the verticle croshair passes through the centre of the bore.. that's what matters. Level has no useful meaning beyond this. Thus the pellets trajectory follows the crosshair as it arcs downwards.

    I kinda get the use of levels for consistency, but as above.. uinless you are benchresting, or possibly prone, it's pretty hard to look at a level whilst aiming and concentrating on everything else.
    Always looking for any cheap, interesting, knackered "project" guns. Thanks, JB.

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