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Thread: Stock Conditioning Without Danish Oil?

  1. #16
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    Stock Conditioning Without Danish Oil?

    Quote Originally Posted by flyingfish View Post
    I have never had a problem with ColronDanish oil. I believe it is mainly Tung oil
    I only use it on bare wood if i've stripped a stock back to re-finish it a couple of coats, then ccl stock conditioning oil rubbed well in to finish, suspect that's all the op would need on his HW100 unless he's stripped it right back to bare wood, i only use danish as it has rot inhibitors in it on bare wood only.

  2. #17
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    [QUOTE=xbow;8147062]I thought Tru-Oil was something of a standard for gun stocks?

    Danish oil can contain any old crap the manufacturers want to put in it so can vary wildly from one manufacturer to another. I can’t stand the stuff.[/QUOTE

    Tru Oli is a misnomer, there is no what could be classed as natural oil in it. For the cost of a small pot of this Tru Oil, a litre of polyurethane varnish could be purchased at the local DIY to give the same result. Some may consider it a standard but it bears no comparison to a quality oil finish. As for Danish oil, I find it ok for garden furniture and could never envisage using it on a stock.

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4end View Post
    It's certainly not rocket science and anyone can do it using traditional means. Buy, beg, steal or acquire some Alkanet/Red oil if you want to deepen the wood colour otherwise buy some refined artist-grade linseed oil. I won't recommend boiled linseed as it can give problems if applied too thickly and turns into a sticky mess. Pour out a capful and dab the pad of your forefinger just into the surface of it, flick off the excess and there you have enough to do half of one side of a stock. Spread this over the butt and massage into the surface, repeat for the forend and for the cut outs where the action sits. Repeat for the other side.
    If your stock is dry and hungry the oil will soak in quite quickly, when it has disappeared give it another coat. If you wish to achieve a traditional oil finish rather than applying a oil dressing, carry on reapplying oil until it will not soak up anymore and once the oil has oxidised within the wood it can be polished to a lustrous finish with the palm of your hand.
    Now tell me what is difficult about that?


    If you were oiling a stock like a factory HW tyrolean with a lot of fine chequering would this method still work?
    I tried this and the oil was clogging up in the panels,
    It looked a mess.

    I stripped it, oiled it again with BLO and wiped it down with an oily cloth as advised by Craig p.
    after three coats it looked like a conker straight out of it's shell and still does, after five years.

    Martin

  4. #19
    chris u'5 is offline I'm a dumbass, it's official!!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moss74 View Post
    If you were oiling a stock like a factory HW tyrolean with a lot of fine chequering would this method still work?
    I tried this and the oil was clogging up in the panels,
    It looked a mess.

    I stripped it, oiled it again with BLO and wiped it down with an oily cloth as advised by Craig p.
    after three coats it looked like a conker straight out of it's shell and still does, after five years.

    Martin
    I've read about people having problems with the chequering as well which is another thing that worries me about the process.
    "Who's the only one here that knows illegal ninja moves from the government?"

  5. #20
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    I always use Danish oil on my stocks, however for penetration and conditioning it's not ideal as it contains a hardener which make it go off in about 6-12 hours, and you can vary the finish by how and the number of coats you use, for conditioning I would use a straight oil of whatever make you choose and then add Danish oil as a sealer after a week or so.

  6. #21
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    For all you guys who think Danish oil is so wonderful !

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    Beware of Danish Oil
    What is Danish Oil?
    The term “Danish Oil” used today is a general term for a type of wood finish. Danish oil is typically wiped on, allowed to soak in to the wood for a while and then excess remaining on the surface is wiped off. Danish oil should contain a high percentage of natural oil that is classified as a drying oil. A drying oil is very important because the finish will actually cure and not remain “oily” like an olive or canola oil would. Also, non-drying oils have the potential to become rancid over time.

    The “Danish” part of Danish Oil seems to appear in general use sometime after World War II, when Scandinavian manufacturers started to export their goods around the world. The finish provided a good-looking, low-sheen finish.

    What does Danish Oil contain?
    The ingredients contained in Danish Oil is extremely varied with each manufacturer having their own proprietary mixtures and percentages. However, most Danish Oils contain many of the following:

    Toxic Waste
    Mineral Spirits
    Aromatic Petroleum Distillates
    Mineral Oil
    Stoddard Solvent
    Tung Oil
    Linseed Oil
    Man-made and/or Natural Resins
    Man-made and/or Natural Varnishes
    Unspecified Vegetable Oil
    Dipropylene Glycol Monomethyl Ether
    Naptha
    Japanese Dryers
    Cobalt Dryers
    Heavy Metal Dryers
    A lesser quality Danish Oil will only have a 10% solids content (the actual drying oil) with the balance being primarily Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs). Higher quality Danish Oils have more than a 50% solids content. For comparison, Dapwood uses natural oils with 100% solids content.

    So what is wrong with Danish Oil?
    The problem with today’s Danish Oil is not the “oil” at all but the other toxins that are put into it. In the race to make it cheaper and faster, industrial coating makers have cut back the oil and increased the other ingredients which are toxic. This is particularly troubling for the two different groups of people that are subjected to these harsh chemicals:

    Working with Danish Oil
    The people who apply Danish Oil need to read the application instructions on the packaging very carefully and plan accordingly. They also need to review and understand the Safety Data Sheet (SDS). Failure to apply the product in a well ventilated room or have appropriate NIOSH respirators will result in a “buzz” from the fumes which can lead to headaches, vomiting and worse.

    Effects Of Overexposure – Chronic Hazards: Reports have associated repeated and prolonged occupational overexposure to solvents with permanent brain and nervous system damage.
    Danish Oil SDS
    Long term exposure to Danish Oil
    While the Danish Oil may be cured in a few days, there will be residuals that come off of the finish for the following weeks, months and years. No one should spend 1/3 of their day sleeping and being exposed to off-gassing chemicals. Unfortunately, long-term exposure studies are extremely difficult to study and quantify. Some might like to put their head in the sand and say that since there are no immediate effects, there is nothing to worry about. This flies in the face of the reality of increased cancer rates, mental health issues and chemical sensitivities. Additionally, what about small children who love to put things in their mouths or chew on things they can’t fit? What are they ingesting and to what degree is this “safe”?

    There is no definitive answer explaining what exposure will do over time to a person. All indications are that it is not good.

    Is Danish Oil really that toxic?
    Yes. We couldn’t make this stuff up. The industrial chemical companies knows they produce toxic substances. So much that “Lethal Dose” standards were created to compare toxicity of substances.

    Lethal Dosage (LD50) Values
    An LD50 is a standard measurement of acute toxicity that is stated in milligrams (mg) of pesticide per kilogram (kg) of body weight. An LD50 represents the individual dose required to kill 50 percent of a population of test animals (e.g., rats, fish, mice, cockroaches). Because LD50 values are standard measurements, it is possible to compare relative toxicities among pesticides. The lower the LD50 dose, the more toxic the pesticide.
    A pesticide with an LD50 value of 10 mg/kg is 10 times more toxic than a pesticide with an LD50 of 100 mg/kg.

    The toxicity of a pesticide is related to the mode of entry of the chemical into an organism. Oral LD50 values are obtained when test subjects are fed pesticide-treated feed or water. Dermal LD50 values are obtained when the pesticide is applied to the skin of the animal. Inhalation LD50 values are obtained when the animal breathes the pesticide with a mask. Often the inhalation LD50 is lower (more toxic) than the oral LD50, which is in turn lower (more toxic) than the dermal LD50.

    LD50 values are not always given on the pesticide label; rather, the relative toxicity of a pesticide product is reflected by one of three signal words: DANGER, WARNING, or CAUTION. The purpose of signal words is to alert the user to the level of toxicity of the product. The signal word is generally assigned based on the pesticide’s inhalation, oral or dermal toxicity, whichever is the most toxic.
    US EPA

    Note that inhalation is often the most toxic method and is the most likely mode of exposure when sleeping at night.

    Another item to note is that LD50 values for one particular American made Danish Oil is “Not Determined”. Unfortunately, this is probably “not determined” because of the time required to create a testing protocol and the cost associated with live animal tests. However, we are able to evaluate the individual components of the mixture and draw a reasonable conclusion.

    Chemical Name Lethal Dose 50 (LD50)
    Mineral Spirits
    Aromatic petroleum distillates
    Dipropylene Glycol Monomethyl Ether
    Stoddard Solvent 4,900 mg/kg (Rat)
    Not Established
    5,350 mg/kg (Rat)
    4,900 mg/kg (Rat)
    So, in order to kill one rat in the half of a rat population that died (no explanation on the condition of the surviving 50% of rats) we can calculate the amount of product required. Since rats weigh about 500 to 700 grams, you would only need 1 to 3.5 grams to do the job. That is less than a sugar packet!

    Let's compare some of the Danish Oil ingredients to toxic substances you can lookup at the National Institute of Health's Toxnet website.

    Chemical Name Lethal Dose 50 (LD50) [Source cited]
    Benzene
    Gasoline 3,306 mg/kg (Rat- oral) [Lewis, R.J. Sr. (ed) Sax's Dangerous Properties of Industrial Materials. 11th Edition. Wiley-Interscience, Wiley & Sons, Inc. Hoboken, NJ. 2004., p. 360]
    14,063 mg/kg (Rat Acute Oral) [DHHS/ATSDR; Toxicological Profile for Automotive Gasoline p.47 (1995)]
    By being able to directly compare LD50 values, we can see that chemicals in Danish Oil are not as toxic as benzene but almost 3 times more toxic than gasoline. There is no doubt that Danish Oil contains some toxic substances.

    Danish Oil Summary
    Since the term "Danish Oil" is often used as a general term for a wood finish, not all products labeled "Danish Oil" are toxic. Most, but not all. What we are concerned about are the Danish Oils that contain industrial solvents.

    We are concerned that not enough information is provided to consumers to decide for themselves what level of exposure is tolerable. Opponents will say that toxicology information is too complicated and inconclusive. Why scare consumers? And do customers really care? What opponents will not say is what company would want to advertise that their product may cause cancer or death?

    At Dapwood, we believe their is no reason to chance it with Danish Oil. We care deeply about our employees as well as our customers. Human health is irreplaceable. Dapwood is committed to using only natural products that are eco friendly and non-toxic. If you decide to not purchase our products, please find something that does not contain a long list of toxic chemicals. You and your family's future health may depend on it.

  7. #22
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    I did a stock with boiled linseed - looks fantastic, but takes time and patience.

    First I stripped the stock with paint stripper as it had been varnished.

    Then applied a very thin coat of boiled linseed oil and rubbed it in using my fingers. The trick is to apply enough that it doesn't pool and go sticky. Let it dry overnight and repeat.

    Great video here

    https://youtu.be/mzVdsln29o8

  8. #23
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    That's a good clip, I was going way too heavy with the oil on my first attempt.
    Didn't have any fags to smoke either

    Martin

  9. #24
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    stock

    Alkanet root oil - leaves a nice dry finish not to shiny rub well in with the palm of your hand

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4end View Post
    For all you guys who think Danish oil is so wonderful !

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    Beware of Danish Oil
    What is Danish Oil?
    The term “Danish Oil” used today is a general term for a type of wood finish. Danish oil is typically wiped on, allowed to soak in to the wood for a while and then excess remaining on the surface is wiped off. Danish oil should contain a high percentage of natural oil that is classified as a drying oil. A drying oil is very important because the finish will actually cure and not remain “oily” like an olive or canola oil would. Also, non-drying oils have the potential to become rancid over time.

    The “Danish” part of Danish Oil seems to appear in general use sometime after World War II, when Scandinavian manufacturers started to export their goods around the world. The finish provided a good-looking, low-sheen finish.

    What does Danish Oil contain?
    The ingredients contained in Danish Oil is extremely varied with each manufacturer having their own proprietary mixtures and percentages. However, most Danish Oils contain many of the following:

    Toxic Waste
    Mineral Spirits
    Aromatic Petroleum Distillates
    Mineral Oil
    Stoddard Solvent
    Tung Oil
    Linseed Oil
    Man-made and/or Natural Resins
    Man-made and/or Natural Varnishes
    Unspecified Vegetable Oil
    Dipropylene Glycol Monomethyl Ether
    Naptha
    Japanese Dryers
    Cobalt Dryers
    Heavy Metal Dryers
    A lesser quality Danish Oil will only have a 10% solids content (the actual drying oil) with the balance being primarily Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs). Higher quality Danish Oils have more than a 50% solids content. For comparison, Dapwood uses natural oils with 100% solids content.

    So what is wrong with Danish Oil?
    The problem with today’s Danish Oil is not the “oil” at all but the other toxins that are put into it. In the race to make it cheaper and faster, industrial coating makers have cut back the oil and increased the other ingredients which are toxic. This is particularly troubling for the two different groups of people that are subjected to these harsh chemicals:

    Working with Danish Oil
    The people who apply Danish Oil need to read the application instructions on the packaging very carefully and plan accordingly. They also need to review and understand the Safety Data Sheet (SDS). Failure to apply the product in a well ventilated room or have appropriate NIOSH respirators will result in a “buzz” from the fumes which can lead to headaches, vomiting and worse.

    Effects Of Overexposure – Chronic Hazards: Reports have associated repeated and prolonged occupational overexposure to solvents with permanent brain and nervous system damage.
    Danish Oil SDS
    Long term exposure to Danish Oil
    While the Danish Oil may be cured in a few days, there will be residuals that come off of the finish for the following weeks, months and years. No one should spend 1/3 of their day sleeping and being exposed to off-gassing chemicals. Unfortunately, long-term exposure studies are extremely difficult to study and quantify. Some might like to put their head in the sand and say that since there are no immediate effects, there is nothing to worry about. This flies in the face of the reality of increased cancer rates, mental health issues and chemical sensitivities. Additionally, what about small children who love to put things in their mouths or chew on things they can’t fit? What are they ingesting and to what degree is this “safe”?

    There is no definitive answer explaining what exposure will do over time to a person. All indications are that it is not good.

    Is Danish Oil really that toxic?
    Yes. We couldn’t make this stuff up. The industrial chemical companies knows they produce toxic substances. So much that “Lethal Dose” standards were created to compare toxicity of substances.

    Lethal Dosage (LD50) Values
    An LD50 is a standard measurement of acute toxicity that is stated in milligrams (mg) of pesticide per kilogram (kg) of body weight. An LD50 represents the individual dose required to kill 50 percent of a population of test animals (e.g., rats, fish, mice, cockroaches). Because LD50 values are standard measurements, it is possible to compare relative toxicities among pesticides. The lower the LD50 dose, the more toxic the pesticide.
    A pesticide with an LD50 value of 10 mg/kg is 10 times more toxic than a pesticide with an LD50 of 100 mg/kg.

    The toxicity of a pesticide is related to the mode of entry of the chemical into an organism. Oral LD50 values are obtained when test subjects are fed pesticide-treated feed or water. Dermal LD50 values are obtained when the pesticide is applied to the skin of the animal. Inhalation LD50 values are obtained when the animal breathes the pesticide with a mask. Often the inhalation LD50 is lower (more toxic) than the oral LD50, which is in turn lower (more toxic) than the dermal LD50.

    LD50 values are not always given on the pesticide label; rather, the relative toxicity of a pesticide product is reflected by one of three signal words: DANGER, WARNING, or CAUTION. The purpose of signal words is to alert the user to the level of toxicity of the product. The signal word is generally assigned based on the pesticide’s inhalation, oral or dermal toxicity, whichever is the most toxic.
    US EPA

    Note that inhalation is often the most toxic method and is the most likely mode of exposure when sleeping at night.

    Another item to note is that LD50 values for one particular American made Danish Oil is “Not Determined”. Unfortunately, this is probably “not determined” because of the time required to create a testing protocol and the cost associated with live animal tests. However, we are able to evaluate the individual components of the mixture and draw a reasonable conclusion.

    Chemical Name Lethal Dose 50 (LD50)
    Mineral Spirits
    Aromatic petroleum distillates
    Dipropylene Glycol Monomethyl Ether
    Stoddard Solvent 4,900 mg/kg (Rat)
    Not Established
    5,350 mg/kg (Rat)
    4,900 mg/kg (Rat)
    So, in order to kill one rat in the half of a rat population that died (no explanation on the condition of the surviving 50% of rats) we can calculate the amount of product required. Since rats weigh about 500 to 700 grams, you would only need 1 to 3.5 grams to do the job. That is less than a sugar packet!

    Let's compare some of the Danish Oil ingredients to toxic substances you can lookup at the National Institute of Health's Toxnet website.

    Chemical Name Lethal Dose 50 (LD50) [Source cited]
    Benzene
    Gasoline 3,306 mg/kg (Rat- oral) [Lewis, R.J. Sr. (ed) Sax's Dangerous Properties of Industrial Materials. 11th Edition. Wiley-Interscience, Wiley & Sons, Inc. Hoboken, NJ. 2004., p. 360]
    14,063 mg/kg (Rat Acute Oral) [DHHS/ATSDR; Toxicological Profile for Automotive Gasoline p.47 (1995)]
    By being able to directly compare LD50 values, we can see that chemicals in Danish Oil are not as toxic as benzene but almost 3 times more toxic than gasoline. There is no doubt that Danish Oil contains some toxic substances.

    Danish Oil Summary
    Since the term "Danish Oil" is often used as a general term for a wood finish, not all products labeled "Danish Oil" are toxic. Most, but not all. What we are concerned about are the Danish Oils that contain industrial solvents.

    We are concerned that not enough information is provided to consumers to decide for themselves what level of exposure is tolerable. Opponents will say that toxicology information is too complicated and inconclusive. Why scare consumers? And do customers really care? What opponents will not say is what company would want to advertise that their product may cause cancer or death?

    At Dapwood, we believe their is no reason to chance it with Danish Oil. We care deeply about our employees as well as our customers. Human health is irreplaceable. Dapwood is committed to using only natural products that are eco friendly and non-toxic. If you decide to not purchase our products, please find something that does not contain a long list of toxic chemicals. You and your family's future health may depend on it.
    This is what I was trying to say earlier. You really don’t know what you’re buying from one manufacturer to another. Boiled linseed oil isn’t much better as it contains metal driers in it.

    Plain oils are best in my view, they make take longer to dry but at least they don’t contain toxins. Oil is often thinned down for the first couple of applications to ensure it penetrates the wood.

    I mentioned Tru-Oil earlier as many folks don’t have the patience for applying a decent finish.
    We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals.
    Rudeness is the weak mans imitation of strength. Eric Hoffer.

    If I don’t reply to your comments it’s probably because you’re on my Ignore list.

  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4end View Post
    For all you guys who think Danish oil is so wonderful !

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    Beware of Danish Oil
    What is Danish Oil?
    The term “Danish Oil” used today is a general term for a type of wood finish. Danish oil is typically wiped on, allowed to soak in to the wood for a while and then excess remaining on the surface is wiped off. Danish oil should contain a high percentage of natural oil that is classified as a drying oil. A drying oil is very important because the finish will actually cure and not remain “oily” like an olive or canola oil would. Also, non-drying oils have the potential to become rancid over time.

    The “Danish” part of Danish Oil seems to appear in general use sometime after World War II, when Scandinavian manufacturers started to export their goods around the world. The finish provided a good-looking, low-sheen finish.

    What does Danish Oil contain?
    The ingredients contained in Danish Oil is extremely varied with each manufacturer having their own proprietary mixtures and percentages. However, most Danish Oils contain many of the following:

    Toxic Waste
    Mineral Spirits
    Aromatic Petroleum Distillates
    Mineral Oil
    Stoddard Solvent
    Tung Oil
    Linseed Oil
    Man-made and/or Natural Resins
    Man-made and/or Natural Varnishes
    Unspecified Vegetable Oil
    Dipropylene Glycol Monomethyl Ether
    Naptha
    Japanese Dryers
    Cobalt Dryers
    Heavy Metal Dryers
    A lesser quality Danish Oil will only have a 10% solids content (the actual drying oil) with the balance being primarily Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs). Higher quality Danish Oils have more than a 50% solids content. For comparison, Dapwood uses natural oils with 100% solids content.

    So what is wrong with Danish Oil?
    The problem with today’s Danish Oil is not the “oil” at all but the other toxins that are put into it. In the race to make it cheaper and faster, industrial coating makers have cut back the oil and increased the other ingredients which are toxic. This is particularly troubling for the two different groups of people that are subjected to these harsh chemicals:

    Working with Danish Oil
    The people who apply Danish Oil need to read the application instructions on the packaging very carefully and plan accordingly. They also need to review and understand the Safety Data Sheet (SDS). Failure to apply the product in a well ventilated room or have appropriate NIOSH respirators will result in a “buzz” from the fumes which can lead to headaches, vomiting and worse.

    Effects Of Overexposure – Chronic Hazards: Reports have associated repeated and prolonged occupational overexposure to solvents with permanent brain and nervous system damage.
    Danish Oil SDS
    Long term exposure to Danish Oil
    While the Danish Oil may be cured in a few days, there will be residuals that come off of the finish for the following weeks, months and years. No one should spend 1/3 of their day sleeping and being exposed to off-gassing chemicals. Unfortunately, long-term exposure studies are extremely difficult to study and quantify. Some might like to put their head in the sand and say that since there are no immediate effects, there is nothing to worry about. This flies in the face of the reality of increased cancer rates, mental health issues and chemical sensitivities. Additionally, what about small children who love to put things in their mouths or chew on things they can’t fit? What are they ingesting and to what degree is this “safe”?

    There is no definitive answer explaining what exposure will do over time to a person. All indications are that it is not good.

    Is Danish Oil really that toxic?
    Yes. We couldn’t make this stuff up. The industrial chemical companies knows they produce toxic substances. So much that “Lethal Dose” standards were created to compare toxicity of substances.

    Lethal Dosage (LD50) Values
    An LD50 is a standard measurement of acute toxicity that is stated in milligrams (mg) of pesticide per kilogram (kg) of body weight. An LD50 represents the individual dose required to kill 50 percent of a population of test animals (e.g., rats, fish, mice, cockroaches). Because LD50 values are standard measurements, it is possible to compare relative toxicities among pesticides. The lower the LD50 dose, the more toxic the pesticide.
    A pesticide with an LD50 value of 10 mg/kg is 10 times more toxic than a pesticide with an LD50 of 100 mg/kg.

    The toxicity of a pesticide is related to the mode of entry of the chemical into an organism. Oral LD50 values are obtained when test subjects are fed pesticide-treated feed or water. Dermal LD50 values are obtained when the pesticide is applied to the skin of the animal. Inhalation LD50 values are obtained when the animal breathes the pesticide with a mask. Often the inhalation LD50 is lower (more toxic) than the oral LD50, which is in turn lower (more toxic) than the dermal LD50.

    LD50 values are not always given on the pesticide label; rather, the relative toxicity of a pesticide product is reflected by one of three signal words: DANGER, WARNING, or CAUTION. The purpose of signal words is to alert the user to the level of toxicity of the product. The signal word is generally assigned based on the pesticide’s inhalation, oral or dermal toxicity, whichever is the most toxic.
    US EPA

    Note that inhalation is often the most toxic method and is the most likely mode of exposure when sleeping at night.

    Another item to note is that LD50 values for one particular American made Danish Oil is “Not Determined”. Unfortunately, this is probably “not determined” because of the time required to create a testing protocol and the cost associated with live animal tests. However, we are able to evaluate the individual components of the mixture and draw a reasonable conclusion.

    Chemical Name Lethal Dose 50 (LD50)
    Mineral Spirits
    Aromatic petroleum distillates
    Dipropylene Glycol Monomethyl Ether
    Stoddard Solvent 4,900 mg/kg (Rat)
    Not Established
    5,350 mg/kg (Rat)
    4,900 mg/kg (Rat)
    So, in order to kill one rat in the half of a rat population that died (no explanation on the condition of the surviving 50% of rats) we can calculate the amount of product required. Since rats weigh about 500 to 700 grams, you would only need 1 to 3.5 grams to do the job. That is less than a sugar packet!

    Let's compare some of the Danish Oil ingredients to toxic substances you can lookup at the National Institute of Health's Toxnet website.

    Chemical Name Lethal Dose 50 (LD50) [Source cited]
    Benzene
    Gasoline 3,306 mg/kg (Rat- oral) [Lewis, R.J. Sr. (ed) Sax's Dangerous Properties of Industrial Materials. 11th Edition. Wiley-Interscience, Wiley & Sons, Inc. Hoboken, NJ. 2004., p. 360]
    14,063 mg/kg (Rat Acute Oral) [DHHS/ATSDR; Toxicological Profile for Automotive Gasoline p.47 (1995)]
    By being able to directly compare LD50 values, we can see that chemicals in Danish Oil are not as toxic as benzene but almost 3 times more toxic than gasoline. There is no doubt that Danish Oil contains some toxic substances.

    Danish Oil Summary
    Since the term "Danish Oil" is often used as a general term for a wood finish, not all products labeled "Danish Oil" are toxic. Most, but not all. What we are concerned about are the Danish Oils that contain industrial solvents.

    We are concerned that not enough information is provided to consumers to decide for themselves what level of exposure is tolerable. Opponents will say that toxicology information is too complicated and inconclusive. Why scare consumers? And do customers really care? What opponents will not say is what company would want to advertise that their product may cause cancer or death?

    At Dapwood, we believe their is no reason to chance it with Danish Oil. We care deeply about our employees as well as our customers. Human health is irreplaceable. Dapwood is committed to using only natural products that are eco friendly and non-toxic. If you decide to not purchase our products, please find something that does not contain a long list of toxic chemicals. You and your family's future health may depend on it.


    So which woke scary cat compiled that little list
    If i took notice of every scare monger throughout the years, I would be wrapped in a bubble instead of enjoying myself and my rifles.

  12. #27
    xbow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tricky-Ricky View Post
    So which woke scary cat compiled that little list
    Try using Google,

    https://www.dapwood.com/danish-oil/
    We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals.
    Rudeness is the weak mans imitation of strength. Eric Hoffer.

    If I don’t reply to your comments it’s probably because you’re on my Ignore list.

  13. #28
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    My point was, I dare say you can find the same scary compilations about most things, PC and H&S has made a lot of useful compounds certain death.

  14. #29
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    Posts
    691
    Holy crap, little wonder my coffee tastes rather odd after stirring it with my screwdriver after a bit of fettling....Never used to.

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Prestwood, Great Missenden
    Posts
    256

    Gunstock oil

    Why not use a proper gunstock oil like Phillips English Walnut Gun Stock Oil which is natural to the wood itself. A 60ml bottle gives a lovely finish to your Walnut Stock, easily applied Price: £5.50

    The walnut oil has been processed and blended with driers and sealants to produce an excellent polishing oil.

    Cheers, Phil
    THE BRAIN CANNOT ASSIMILATE WHAT THE POSTERIA CANNOT TOLERATE

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